It's time to plant!

The extended forecast looks to have no frost, so for those who like to get an early start on the garden, I'd say go for it.  Keep an ear to the news, though, and if we get a surprise frost you can cover those plants.

Getting an early start can be satisfying and may fit in to your schedule, but waiting until the ground warms up won't hurt, either.  Those seedlings started earlier won't do much until the ground is warm anyway, so it just depends on when you can get into the garden.  

Either way, these overcast days are PERFECT for planting.  You won't have to worry about hardening the plants off (i.e. acclimating them to being outside).

Any time you take a plant that's been in a protected environment, and plant directly out on a sunny, breezy day, the plants will go into shock.  If you see the leaves turn white,  that's a sign of shock.  The plants will recover, but it's a set-back.  So acclimate your plants by putting them out in the elements a little at a time--say, 2 hours the first day, 3 or 4 the next, and then plant out on the third day.  If you have no choice about buying and planting on the same day, cover the newly planted seedlings with row cover for a few days and acclimate them that way.

We have a good supply of vegetable starts at the greenhouse and a pretty wide selection of varieties.  Click on 'Plant List' for specifics.

Always send us your feedback if you recommend a particular variety, or if you find a variety that does especially well in our area.

Staggered plantings of tomatoes.

Staggered plantings of tomatoes.

We started these early on.  These are Bush Early Girl

We started these early on.  These are Bush Early Girl

Getting a jump on the season.

Getting a jump on the season.